New Years Hell, Battle of Stones River

New Years Hell, Battle of Stones River

ByJustin McKinneyDecember 28, 2020

As 1862 approached its conclusion, the respective war efforts were in a state of flux. Confederate forces remained largely on the defensive. While Federals forces were ordered into the field by President Abraham Lincoln in a late year offensive. In hopes of bolstering the impact of Emancipation Proclamation, which was announced on September 22nd and was set to officially take effect on January 1, 1863, Lincoln ordered three of his principal commanders…

The Peach Orchard Battle

The Confederate attack during the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg overran the Union III Corps and, in…

Samuel Bell Maxey

American soldier, lawyer, and politician from Paris, Texas, United States. He was a Major General for the Confederacy in…

Morgan’s Raid

Morgan’s Raid was a diversionary incursion by Confederate cavalry into the northern (Union) states of Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and, briefly, West Virginia, during the American Civil War.

The Battlefield of Yellow Tavern, Virginia

Though this battlefield has been lost to time, with effort, lingering traces of the ultimate Confederate cavalier’s last battle can still be found hidden in the Richmond suburbs.

Battle of Big Bethel

The Battle of Big Bethel, also known as the Battle of Bethel Church or Great Bethel was one of the earliest land battles of the American Civil War (Civil War) after the surrender of Fort Sumter. The battle between Union Army and Confederate States Army forces on June 10, 1861 took place in Hampton and York County, Virginia, (near the present-day unincorporated…

Biographies

Union, Confederate, Presidents, to Major Personalities
of the American Civil War

Joseph Eggleston Johnston

Overview Petty considerations over rank and military etiquette and wounds cost the Confederacy, for lengthy periods, the services of one of its most effective, top commanders, Joseph E. Johnston. The Virginia native and West Pointer (1829), rated by many as more capable than Lee, was the highest-ranking regular army officer to resign and join the…

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain

Born: September 8, 1828, Brewer, ME Died: February 24, 1914, Portland, ME Buried: Pine Grove Cemetery, Brunswick, ME Life A Bowdoin College professor, Joshua L. Chamberlain went to the Maine state capital to offer his services in 1862. Offered the colonelcy of a regiment, he declined, according to John J. Pullen in The 20th Maine, preferring to “start a little lower…

Philip St. George Cooke

Born: June 13, 1809, Leesburg, VA Died: March 20, 1895, Detroit, MI Place of burial: Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, MI Battles and wars: Black Hawk War, Mexican–American War, MORE Children: Flora Cooke, John Rogers Cooke Life Born in Leesburg, Virginia, June 13, 1809, the U.S. Army was Cooke’s life for 50 years. Graduating 23d in the West Point class of 1827, he was a veteran of…

Ambrose Powell Hill

Overview Known for his red battle shirt and his hard-hitting attacks at the head of the famed Light Division, Ambrose P. Hill proved to be an example of the Peter principle. Military In reserve at lst Bull Run, he fought at Yorktown and Williamsburg before being given command of a division. On the day he…