Lincoln Conspirators July 7, 1865

On July 6, 1865 the convicted assassins of President Abraham Lincoln, Payne, David Herold, George Atzerodt and Mary Surratt, languish in their cells at the Washington Arsenal in Washington, DC. They have been sentenced to die, but they do not know when. At midday their uncertainty is dispelled as they are informed that the next…
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Confederates defeated at the Battle of Tupelo

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest .. Suffers his biggest defeat when Union General Andrew J. Smith routs his force in Tupelo, Mississippi. The battle came just a month after the Battle of Brice’s Crossroads, Mississippi, in which Forrest engineered a brilliant victory over a larger Union force from Memphis that was designed to keep him…
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Assault of Battery Wagner and death of Robert Gould Shaw

Union Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and 272 of his troops are killed in an assault on Fort Wagner, near Charleston, South Carolina. Shaw was commander of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry, perhaps the most famous regiment of African-American troops during the war. Fort Wagner stood on Morris Island, guarding the approach to Charleston harbor. It was…
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July 17, 1864: Hood takes command of the Army of Tennessee

The day is July 17, 1864, Confederate President Jefferson Davis replaces General Joseph Johnston with John Bell Hood as commander of the Army of Tennessee. Davis, impatient with Johnston’s defensive strategy in the Atlanta campaign, felt that Hood stood a better chance of saving Atlanta from the forces of Union General William T. Sherman. “Lieut.…
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Introductory: Confederate General Stand Watie

Dec 12, 1806: Cherokee leader and Confederate General Stand Watie is born On this day in 1806, Confederate General Stand Watie is born near Rome, Georgia. Watie, a Cherokee Indian, survived the tribe’s Trail of Tears in the 1830s and became the only Native American to achieve the rank of general during the Civil War.…
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Alice Shirley, a residential testimony

Alice Shirley A resident of Wexford Lodge, born in Vicksburg to a family of Northern stock, Alice and her brothers kept their Union sympathies to themselves when their state seceded. Federal troops later besieged their home, Wexford Lodge, which fell within the front lines. With their home riddled with shot and shell, the family was…
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Gerrit Roosen 1612

Gerhard (or Gerrit) Roosen (1612-1711) was a Mennonite bishop in northern Germany. He  is famous today mostly for the catechism he published when he was 90 years old, the Christliches Gemütsgespräch or “Christian Spiritual Conversation on Saving Faith and the Acknowledging of the Truth Which Is After Godliness in Hope of Eternal Life (Titus 1:1, 2), in Questions and Answers…
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Herbert Coleridge, Unrecognized 1st editor of OED

Herbert Coleridge, lexicographer Born 1830, Died 1861 When we think about the necessities of looking up a word in this era, it’s typically as easy as pulling it up on our phone with a quick Google search. Rarely, if at all, will we utilize a standard dictionary book in our home library that’s been collecting…
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The life of John Bell Hood

John Bell Hood Confederate general Served from 1853–1861 (US), and 1861–1865 (CSA) Hood attended the United States Military Academy, supposedly against his fathers’ wishes. Although Hood was native to Kentucky, he preferred his adoptive state of Texas, and joined the Confederate army on the 4th Texas Infantry where he quickly became a colonel. Hood was…
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